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Obesity & life expectancy; mercury in fish; no more high-fives; Dr On Call

Being slightly overweight may actually help you live longer, according to a recent study. A new study finds widespread, unsafe levels of mercury in people and fish. Many people are taking drastic measures to prevent the flu from spreading.
Being slightly overweight may actually help you live longer, according to a recent study.

Researchers looked at the body mass index of 3 million people compared to the risk of death.

The study found people with a little extra weight had a six-percent lower risk of dying compared to people considered "normal" weight.

Just to be clear -- it's not an excuse to pack on the pounds. Obese people had more than triple the risk of dying, according to the study. And the research looked at only death, not chronic medical conditions.

Researchers warn of mercury levels in fish

A new study finds widespread, unsafe levels of mercury in people and fish.

Research by the biodiversity research institute found more than 82-percent of human hair samples from eight countries exceeded typically safe levels of mercury by the EPA.

Generally, it found people and marine ecosystems across the world are contaminated with mercury and levels in people and fish regularly exceed safe levels.

The report is part of the study in collaboration with anti-toxins group IPEN.

Youth soccer bans high fives to stop the flu

With the flu crisis getting worse -- many people are taking drastic measures to prevent the virus from spreading.

A youth soccer club in New York is requesting children stop high-fiving and hand shaking at games.

The Manhattan Soccer Club sent an e-mail to parents making the recommendation.

The president of the soccer club is also an infectious disease specialist.

"We just thought it would be prudent to have some safety protocols in place for the kids." Dr. Valerie Parkas, President of Manhattan Youth.

"At the end of the game, they'll meet each other and give each other the elbow."

The email also asks parents to keep sick players home and encourage players to practice good hygiene, like hand washing.

Doctor On Call

Alma says, "I got the flu shot and I still got the flu. Why?"

Dr. Oksana Melnyk from Baptist Health Family Clinic says, “The viruses contained in the flu shot are dead and can't give people the flu, according to the experts at the CDC.

“Flu shots tend to be given at the time of the year when respiratory viruses run rampant anyway, so it shouldn't come as surprise that some people catch a respiratory bug right around the same time they receive the vaccine. Also, because it takes about 2 weeks to build up the immunity to the virus after the receiving a shot, some people may get sick with the flu within that time frame.”

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