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Thyroid myths; salt intake guidelines; school snacks rule

More than 20 million Americans, both men and women, have some type of thyroid disorder. The World Health Organization issues new guidelines on salt intake. A government ruling is on the way to determine what kind of snacks can be sold to students in schools.
More than 20 million Americans, both men and women, have some type of thyroid disorder.

Doctors say one myth about the thyroid is that only women get thyroid disease.

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck. It may be small but plays a big role in major body functions like metabolism.

The most common thyroid condition is underactive thyroid. This is where the gland is not producing enough thyroid hormone.

Other thyroid problems include overactive thyroid, enlarged thyroid, thyroid nodules or cancer.

Dr. Hatipoglu says some people fear that a thyroid nodule or growth always means cancer but that's not the case.

Betul Hatipoglu, M.D says, "When you have a growth it doesn't mean you have a thyroid cancer, indeed 90-95% of those are benign but you could see what you have and if needed a biopsy can be done or you can even have it removed."

If you suspect a problem with your thyroid or you're just not feeling 'right,' ask your doctor to screen for thyroid problems. Screening is simple and treatment can improve your quality of life.

Salt intake guidelines

The World Health Organization issues new guidelines on salt intake.

For the first time the agency recommends limits on a child's daily salt consumption based on their size, age and energy needs.

They hope will help fight the global fight against diet-related diseases.

For adults the recommendation is now for less than 2,000 milligrams of sodium and 3,500 milligrams of potassium a day.

A UN health agency spokesperson says sticking to the new recommendations would help reduce morbidity and mortality.

School snacks rule

A government ruling is on the way to determine what kind of snacks can be sold to students in schools.

The USDA expects a proposal by April on what types of foods and drinks are to be sold outside traditional cafeteria meals.

Tops on the list of concerns are high calorie, sugar sweetened beverages, which are highly popular among young people, but offer no nutritional benefits.

Once the proposal comes there will be a 60 day public comment period before the final rules are issued.

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