FOX16.com

World AIDS Day; eating bugs for health

Saturday is World Aids Day and UNAIDS executive director Michel Sidibe says we should take World AIDS Day as a day of honor and reflection. Scorpions, crickets and other insects are inching their way into America’s diets.
Saturday is World Aids Day and UNAIDS executive director Michel Sidibe says we should take World AIDS Day as a day of honor and reflection.

UNAIDS goal is to have zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination against those with the virus and zero related deaths by 2015.

The agency expressed appreciation for President Obama’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) blueprint. But Sidibe says more needs to be done.

“What we need to remember we still have seven million people that are missing treatment today and we know that life is hanging in the balance,” Sidibe says. “And if we don't work together to reduce the price of a drug to continue to reach those people they will die.”

World AIDS Day was established in 1988 by the World Health Organization as a way to promote advocacy for those with the HIV virus.

Scorpions, crickets and other insects are inching their way into America’s diets.

Silk worm larvae stir-fried with soy, sugar and just a dash of white pepper.

"The silkworms have a texture of like popcorn except they have a creamy center."

Bon appétit!

Typhoon restaurant in Santa Monica is one of a handful of restaurants - right here in America - that serve patrons bugs… on purpose.

Chili pepper seasoned crickets, even scorpions, on shrimp toast.

"Scorpions still have the stingers in them but they are dried. The poison is neutralized."

Scorpions are just one of 1,700 bugs that are safe for people to consume.

It’s still a novelty here in the states, but insects are part of a daily diet in most of the world.

Earlier this year, the United Nations held a global conference on the benefits of eating insects, even suggesting it might be a good solution to world hunger!

"I don't know why the United States doesn't eat insects because they're actually very healthy for you."

And he's right. Insects are high in protein and low in fat and cholesterol.

Take a cricket for example. A six-ounce serving of these crunchy bugs have 60 percent less saturated fat as the same amount of ground beef.

"And now the ants."

These string-potatoes aren't complete without adding some dried ants.

"They taste a little sour, tangy and they have a hint of black pepper to them."

They also have 14 grams of protein per serving.

With a growing population and rising costs of food, the rest of the world just might be on to something.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Weather Right Now

89°F
Mostly Cloudy
High: 89°F
Low: 75°F

7 day forecast