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Accused soldier killer says he's like other notorious figures

Self-proclaimed terrorist Abdulhakim Muhammad is comparing himself to some of the most notorious Islamic extremists in his latest jailhouse letter to FOX16. Part two highlights his belief he is part of a larger Muslim army waging a holy war.
Self-proclaimed terrorist Abdulhakim Muhammad is comparing himself to some of the most notorious Islamic extremists in his latest jailhouse letter. Part two highlights his belief he is part of a larger Muslim army waging a holy war.

He calls it his "last public statement" before his trial next week.

In it Muhammad, 26, says he's showing respect to what he calls other “real” Muslim soldiers, including John Walker Lindh, dubbed the American Taliban after he was captured in Afghanistan in 2001.

His handwritten letter also includes “salaams and farewells” to Army Major Nidal Hasan, who is accused in the massacre of 13 fellow soldiers at Ft. Hood, TX in 2009.

Felicia Epps is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the UALR Bowen School of Law. Epps says a cursory look at the contents of this latest letter suggest some type of mental health issue.

“If you are a smart defendant you follow the advice of your attorney which is normally going to be you're not going to talk to the press," Epps says.

Despite the numerous statements Muhammad has made to reporters and judges, ultimately it comes down to what a jury of 12 inside the Pulaski County courthouse next week finds as evidence. The goal now is to find that jury.

"Potential jurors have seen the news media coverage about letters being written, maybe read the text of some of those things, then that has the potential to bias people against him," Epps says.

Muhammad has repeatedly admitted he's responsible for the June 2009 double shooting outside the Army recruiting office on Rodney Parham that killed Pvt. William Long and injured Pvt. Quinton Ezeagwula.

"That's what the case is about,” Epps says. “Whether he's is going to give us this business about jihad or he's justified, that's not going to help him."

And from his latest letter, it's unclear whether he even cares.

Epps says it's not going to be easy to seat a jury in this case but it is definitely possible.

Jury selection is expected to take all day Monday.

Muhammad renounces U.S. citizenship in letter to FOX16

LITTLE ROCK, AR - In a letter to FOX16 reporter David Goins, accused soldier killer Abdulhakim Muhammad says he is renouncing his U.S. citizenship. This ahead of his capital murder trial set to begin in Pulaski County next week.

Writing to me on his 26th birthday from the Pulaski County jail, Abdulhakim Muhammad says right on the envelope this is his "last public statement".

In the handwritten letter, the accused soldier killer says: "before this bogus upcoming sham trial that will most certainly end with me on death row, I publicly renounce my citizenship of America."

It's the latest in a long-string of letters and statements and interviews from the Nashville, Tennessee native, who was born Carlos Bledsoe.

Muhammad has admitted several times to reporters that he pulled up in front of the Army recruiting center on Rodney Parham in June 2009 and intentionally opened fire on two U.S. soldiers, killing Pvt. William Long of Conway and wounding Pvt. Quinton Ezeagwula of Jacksonville.

Muhammad has claimed various allegiances over the last two years of incarceration including to Osama bin Laden & al-Qaeda of the Arabian Peninsula.

In his letter dated July 9th to me he now says: "I pledge my allegiance to Mullah Omar." Omar is the reputed spiritual leader of the Taliban in Afghanistan.

No matter his reported allegiance, his next stop in the legal system is an Arkansas courtroom.

I read the letter to Pulaski County prosecutor Larry Jegley over the phone Monday evening. Jegley said he didn't want to say anything that could cause any more delays for his case against Muhammad.

Claiborne Ferguson, one of Muhammad’s defense attorneys based out of Memphis, said the letter would have no effect on the trial that begins with jury selection on Monday.

The U.S. State Department says if a citizen wants to renounce their citizenship they must do it before a U.S. consular in a foreign country.
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