Special Report: How to Break Up 101

Special Report: How to Break Up 101

A new initiative is teaching kids how to control their impulses when breaking up. Researchers say in some cases breaking up can become violent and sometimes deadly.
LITTLE ROCK, AR-- A new initiative is teaching kids how to control their impulses when breaking up. Researchers say in some cases breaking up can become violent and sometimes deadly.

A recent survey found 10 percent of students reported being physically hurt by their boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year. Experts say social media is not helping the problem.

"It's either text or it's either Facebook. Everyone sees it and it's just drama all over," said 15-year-old Trey Smith.

Casey Corcoran, program director for Futures without Violence, says the challenge of text breakups is there's a character limit. Students can only say so much and they don't get tone of voice.

"There are concrete skills that go into healthy breakups. Teens need to know what they are and they need to have the opportunity to practice them in a safe environment," said Corcoran.

The federal government, high schools, colleges, hospitals and insurance companies are investing in new teen violence prevention classes. It's called the "Break-Up Summit," which is part of the Start Strong Initiative now being taught on campuses nationwide.

Experts encourage face-to-face breakups.

"It allows for body language," said Corcoran.

While the program does advocate face-to-face breakups for most relationships, proponents stress that an abusive relationship should be ended remotely.
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