Tenants Upset after Housing Authority Charges for Bed Bug Infestation

Tenants Upset after Housing Authority Charges for Bed Bug Infestation

Bed bugs in a housing authority building has tenants itching for answers after they were told to pay for the treatment.
HOT SPRINGS, AR - Bed bugs in a housing authority building has tenants itching for answers after they were told to pay for the treatment.

The tenants say they shouldn't have to fork over the cash when they're not the ones responsible.

On the other side of the windows of the Mountainview Towers are ten rooms infested with bed bugs.

During an inspection last week management found the pests.

One of the units belongs to Saundra Mckenzie's disabled brother Tom.

The Hot Springs Housing Authority manages the property and holds the tenants responsible for the bugs.

When asked if she thinks that's fair, Mckenzie responded, "No. It's not. Not when he didn't have them when he first came in."

The Housing Authority says they work to provide an environment that is clean, well maintained and attractive.

"I feel that we have taken proactive measures in order to ensure that," explained Executive Director Barbara Baer.

Baer says they have tenants sign a form annually and when they move in agreeing there are no bed bugs.

The Hot Spring Housing Authority started the addendum process about a year and a half ago. Before then they say the bedbug problem was 2-3 times worse.

They claim the exterminator and maintenance do monthly checks in the room which provides reason for them to believe it's the tenants fault when bed bugs suddenly appear.

Management argues tenants bring bed bugs in on furniture that they picked up outside.

Mckenzie's brother Tom is disabled and doesn't go anywhere unless it's with her. She says she doesn't have bedbugs.

"So I know it has to be a housing problem," Mckenzie persisted.

The Housing Authority charges the tenants 450 bucks to bring in an exterminator to treat for bed bugs.

"We make it affordable," Baer remarked. "This is low income housing."

Mckenzie argued, "It shouldn't have been that much."

Now her disabled brother who brings in about $700 a month may have to cover the difference.

"I don't know," she said. "I don't know what we're gonna do."
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus