Young lifts Arkansas past Longwood, 112-63

Young lifts Arkansas past Longwood, 112-63

BJ Young made the most of his season debut for Arkansas, and he looked right at home in starting lineup in the process.
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) - BJ Young made the most of his season debut for Arkansas, and he looked right at home in starting lineup in the process.

Young, who was suspended from the Razorbacks' opener for a violation of team rules, scored 23 points Sunday in a 112-63 win over Longwood.

The sophomore, who led Arkansas (2-0) in scoring last season, was 10-of-16 shooting and helped the Razorbacks top the 100-point mark for the first time in three seasons. Young started just seven games last season, averaging 15.3 points per game primarily off the bench, but he made the most of his 20 minutes of action on Sunday in the blowout win.

"It's fun coming out there from the jump and being able to contribute all 40 minutes from the tip," Young said.

The easy win for Arkansas was a stark contrast to a 73-68 season-opening victory over Sam Houston State, a game in which the Razorbacks struggled at times without Young. Against the Lancers (0-3), the Razorbacks scored 47 points off 28 turnovers and had six players finish in double figures.

Marshawn Powell had 16 points and Rickey Scott 12, while freshmen Anthlon Bell (16 points), Jacorey Williams (11) and Michael Qualls (10) each played a role in lifting Arkansas past the century mark for the first time since a 130-68 win over Alcorn State to open the 2009-10 season.

Arkansas reached the mark with 3:34 remaining against Longwood after a drive by Williams, and led by as many as 51 points in the second half. The Razorbacks, who had 27 assists to the Lancers' seven, also had a 58-15 advantage off the bench.

"It was very encouraging," Arkansas coach Mike Anderson said. "I think the best component of our basketball team is going to be our bench. The guys that are starting out, hopefully they go out and do the things they're capable of doing.

"But I think in order for us to be a total team, it's going to require those guys coming off the bench giving us some great minutes."

Michael Kessens led Longwood (0-3) with 17 points and 11 rebounds, while Tristan Carey added 12 points and David Robinson 11. The Lancers shot 39.6 percent (21 of 53) and were plagued by turnovers - including a combined 13 from guards Nik Brown and Lucas Woodhouse.

"That is a different level for us," Longwood coach Mike Gillian said. "We are not going to face too many teams with this athletic ability, especially at this point with not a great amount of time to get ready for that.

"... Create turnovers, turn them into points. That's what they were able to do. That is pretty much the story of the afternoon."

Arkansas took advantage of its easy opportunities and shot 52.4 percent (43 of 82) from the field. They forced 16 first-half turnovers and used an early 12-0 run to take a 26-10 lead, capped by a Williams' basket that came after Longwood's 11th turnover of the half.

Young put the Razorbacks up 37-19 after a steal, basket on the fast break and free throw, scoring 16 points in 14 minutes in the first half. He didn't let up before exiting early in the second half - throwing down a two-handed dunk on the break to put Arkansas up 62-34.

"It felt good to be back out there with the team, helping the team, contributing any way I can," Young said. "It just felt good to be back out there playing in front of the fans, too. I'm just happy to be back."

Arkansas had 28 fast-break points and 17 on second chances, thanks to 23 offensive rebounds. Coty Clarke had 10 rebounds to lead the Razorbacks, who outrebounded the Lancers 48-32 - a game after being outrebounded 36-23 against Sam Houston State.

"We paid attention to some of the little details that we didn't do in our opening game," Anderson said. "So, I thought the focus was totally different."

(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
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