Friends More Likely than Strangers to Share Genetic Traits

Friends More Likely than Strangers to Share Genetic Traits

A study of over 1,300 friendship pairs found close friends were more likely than strangers to share genetic markers.
Scientists say the people we choose to hang out with may not be as random as we think.

A study of over 1,300 friendship pairs found close friends were more likely than strangers to share genetic markers.

Although the resemblance is slight, it's equivalent to the relationship between fourth cousins.

While friends' appearances were often similar, many also shared genes related to smell and other non-superficial traits.

In other health news, a new study suggests women can improve their heart health by playing soccer!

Researchers had a group of mostly sedentary and overweight women play soccer three times a week and compared them to a group who made no lifestyle changes.

After 15 weeks, the soccer group had significantly lower blood pressure, lost four times more body fat and had better endurance than the control group.
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