More Cuts Coming for Pulaski Tech

More Cuts Coming for Pulaski Tech

Voters avoided a tax increase by turning down a millage that would have given more money to the State's largest two-year college. Now Pulaski Tech will cut back on critical programs.
Chemistry teachers say students have had to use the same equipment for the last ten years.
Chemistry teachers say students have had to use the same equipment for the last ten years.
NORTH LITTLE ROCK, AR - It all came down to money.

If the Pulaski Tech Millage vote passed, what would have happened, for example, someone with a home valued at $100 thousand would have paid 38 bucks more a year in taxes.

It didn't and since Pulaski Technical College says they've already been raising tuition every year for the last ten years, certain departments, programs and services may take the hit now.

Students in the classrooms there have used the same lab equipment that filled the same rooms ten years ago.

Bruce Shulte, Physics and Chemistry Instructor, says they just don't have the backing to get more help.

"We sincerely need more lab space for more students," he said. "We need the support."

It's evident, after Tuesday night's polls, most voters don't have the school's back and students like David Dixon are beginning to notice.

"I'm very upset about it," he said.

Pulaski County voters shot down the millage increase by 3 to 1.

If the millage would have passed, the College had plans to replace technological equipment and renovate the math and science laboratories.

Now the school is looking in a very different direction.

Pulaski Tech President, Dr. Margaret Ellibee, compares theirs to a home budget when a household has increasing costs but salaries flatline or decrease.

"Certainly we were hoping for a positive outcome," she said Wednesday (3/12). "We're gonna experience some rather significant belt tightening."

Now this household leader has to look very carefully at all of their programs and services.

"Will there be constraints on that?" Dr. Ellibee asked. "I think so."

Dr. Ellibee wouldn't say which specific program or how exactly they plan to move forward. She only said they started looking and evaluating at about 8:30 Wednesday morning.

Without saying how severe cuts may be or where they'll hit, it's leaving students like Dixon left to wonder what will happen to their programs.

"I don't want that to go away," he worried. "I don't want anything to happen to anyone else's programs like math and science."
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