Bass anglers participate in a catch-and-keep tournament for conservation

Local News

PLUMERVILLE, Ark. — (News release) A winning weight of 10 fish for just over 10 pounds would have most bass-fishing tournament directors contemplating a permanent blacklisting of the lake from their schedule, but Jared Pridmore, director of the Lake Brewer Bass Club and owner of JP Custom Baits, was nothing but smiles when he saw the results of his “Tiny Fish Tournament” in April. The only thing that made him happier than the low weight was the sight of the fish-filled cooler where participants turned in their fish instead of releasing them to the water.

Lake Brewer is the main drinking water supply for about 20,000 people in Conway County as well as another 60,000 people in and around the City of Conway in Faulkner County. It was constructed in 1983 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and maintenance of the lake was turned over to the Conway Corporation the year it was built. In addition to providing water for nearby residents, the 1,166-acre reservoir has proven to be a fantastic fishery, even being featured in an episode of Major League Fishing a few years ago.Jared Pridmore with fish from tournamentsrcset="https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/b5/16/b5164623-fe76-47dc-9e6e-8b549cef2bcd/jared_pridmore_little_fishsmall.jpg__400x443_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=160 160w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/b5/16/b5164623-fe76-47dc-9e6e-8b549cef2bcd/jared_pridmore_little_fishsmall.jpg__400x443_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=256 256w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/b5/16/b5164623-fe76-47dc-9e6e-8b549cef2bcd/jared_pridmore_little_fishsmall.jpg__400x443_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=320 320w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/b5/16/b5164623-fe76-47dc-9e6e-8b549cef2bcd/jared_pridmore_little_fishsmall.jpg__400x443_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=640 640w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/b5/16/b5164623-fe76-47dc-9e6e-8b549cef2bcd/jared_pridmore_little_fishsmall.jpg__400x443_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=876 876w" sizes="(max-width: 899px) 100vw, 876px"

“Brewer is a great lake, and about five years ago, you needed to have at least five fish for 20 pounds to have a chance of placing in a tournament there, but it’s getting full of small fish,” Pridmore said. “Word got out that it was hot, and between fishing pressure and the tons of small fish, you don’t see nearly as many fish over the lake’s slot limit.”

The “slot limit” Pridmore refers to is a special regulation placed on some lakes where bass of a certain size must be released immediately back to the water to protect them from harvest. In Brewer’s case, any largemouth bass between 13 and 16 inches long cannot be kept for eating or weigh-ins to be released later, but fish under 13 inches and over 16 inches can be kept.

According to Matt Schroeder, fisheries biologist at the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Mayflower office, slot limits are intended to help produce and maintain good fish populations, but can have a negative effect if some harvest isn’t practiced.

“Lakes that have good growth and produce consistently good spawns are typical candidates for slot limits,” Schroeder said. “You’re wanting to protect your best spawning year classes of fish, while allowing harvest above and below that to thin out some of the competition for food. Your most abundant year-class of fish is going to be the youngest fish, so harvesting them lets the fish in the protected slot get more food and grow to larger sizes.”

But Schroeder warns that if no one is harvesting the small fish, the slot limit becomes ineffective and the lake may see slower growth from too many mouths to feed.

“You’ve essentially created a minimum length limit at that point, and lakes with good recruitment and good growth can actually see a decline in production of large fish when that happens,” Schroeder said. “We want people catching and keeping the fish under the slot limit if it’s going to work.”

Pridmore, and Lake Brewer Bass Club president Lynn Hensley say they want to do what they can to help bring bigger fish back to the lake.

“You catch a ton of those small fish in here right now,” Hensley said. “And you’re not going to get big fish if all the food is going to those small ones.”

Lynn weigh insmall.jpg

The April tiny fish tournament had some major differences from standard fishing tournaments:

  1. Anglers could weigh in up to 10 largemouth bass per boat that were under the 13- to 16-inch slot limit.
  2. All largemouth bass weighed that were under the slot were put in a cooler for any of the anglers to take home and enjoy as long as they didn’t go over any possession limits. 

Even with the catch-and-keep rules in place, tournament directors still released a few fish.

“We let every team weigh in one fish that was over the slot limit in a separate big-fish contest, so anyone who caught a big one today would still get to enjoy a shot at a prize,” Hensley said. “We released all fish over the slot back to the water. We also released any Kentucky bass because they aren’t included in the slot limit regulations.”cooler of underssmall.jpgsrcset="https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/c7/81/c781ea99-bacf-469d-8c3b-1dd69e2af5e4/cooler_of_underssmall.jpg__400x605_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=160 160w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/c7/81/c781ea99-bacf-469d-8c3b-1dd69e2af5e4/cooler_of_underssmall.jpg__400x605_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=256 256w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/c7/81/c781ea99-bacf-469d-8c3b-1dd69e2af5e4/cooler_of_underssmall.jpg__400x605_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=320 320w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/c7/81/c781ea99-bacf-469d-8c3b-1dd69e2af5e4/cooler_of_underssmall.jpg__400x605_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=640 640w, https://agfc-media.s3.amazonaws.com/filer_public_thumbnails/filer_public/c7/81/c781ea99-bacf-469d-8c3b-1dd69e2af5e4/cooler_of_underssmall.jpg__400x605_q85_crop_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg?w=876 876w" sizes="(max-width: 899px) 100vw, 876px"

Overall, the tournament was a success, and many of the anglers still had the same competitive spirit at weigh-in, although social distancing protocols in April prevented any large crowds at the weigh-in table. At the end of the day, the team of Luci and Chris Johnson from Prairie Grove took the title with 10 fish weighing a less than massive 10.35 pounds.

“We had 22 teams show up to fish, which isn’t bad considering the social distancing that we all have to work through,” Pridmore said. “We even had folks like [the Johnsons] drive down from Northwest Arkansas to join in the fun. We pulled a little over 100 fish under the slot limit from the lake.”

While 100 fish being removed isn’t likely to influence the growth rates of fish in a lake as large and fertile as Brewer, Ben Batten, AGFC chief of fisheries, says it’s more about promoting the principle that keeping fish is OK, and even needed in some cases.

“There are a lot more bass swimming in that lake than most anglers realize,” Batten said. “We don’t manage these lakes for fish to die of old age. Bass are a renewable resource, and we manage the lakes so people can enjoy fishing for them. Some people don’t want to keep any fish, and that’s fine, but others do want to catch and keep, and that’s totally fine, too. We set limits to make sure the resource remains and we factor harvest into that decision.”

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